Why Bitcoin Matters Marc Andreessen

Mark Andreessen gets Bitcoin but apparently not Twitter

Mark Andreessen gets Bitcoin but apparently not Twitter submitted by BigButtCoin to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Weekly news review (July 6-12)

Weekly news review (July 6-12)
Hello, dear Community!
Are you ready for last week's news review? Say no more!
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The European Central Bank (ECB) doubled down on its dismissive stance on bitcoin (BTC) July 9, refusing to recognize it as currency in a Q&A session.
“Bitcoin is not a currency, it rather is an asset and it is very volatile,” officials wrote quoting chief economist, Philip Lane.
In May this year, a report dubbed “Crypto-Assets: Implications for financial stability, monetary policy, and payments and market infrastructures” concluded the entire phenomenon had little impact on the traditional economy.
Previously, the European Union’s reserve bank had also come out bearish on the idea of issuing a digital currency of its own, in contrast to noises now coming from China and several other states.

Cybersecurity researchers have revealed eye-opening details about a widespread Android malware campaign wherein attackers silently replaced installed legitimate apps with their malicious versions on nearly 25 million mobile phones.
According to researchers at Check Point, attackers are distributing a new kind of Android malware that disguises itself as innocent-looking photo editing, adult entertainment, or gaming apps and available through widely used third-party app stores.
Dubbed Agent Smith, the malware takes advantage of multiple Android vulnerabilities, such as the Janus flaw and the Man-in-the-Disk flaw, and injects malicious code into the APK files of targeted apps installed on a compromised device and then automatically re-install/updates them without the victims' knowledge or interaction.
Researchers initially encountered the Agent Smith malware in early 2019, which was primarily being found targeting Android devices in India (with 15 million infected devices) and other nearby Asian countries like Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Nepal.

Donald J. Trump tweeted Thursday that he is “not a fan” of cryptocurrencies, saying they were “not money” and referencing their price volatility relative to the dollar in his first public comments on crypto since becoming president of the United States.
In his tweets Thursday, Trump took aim at the potential for using cryptocurrencies in illegal activities, citing drug trafficking in particular.
“Unregulated Crypto Assets can facilitate unlawful behavior, including drug trade and other illegal activity,” he said.

Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, co-founders of the New York-based crypto exchange Gemini, may soon join the Libra Association, the consortium governing Facebook’s proposed cryptocurrency.
Joining Libra might be a surprise move to some, considering the Winklevoss brothers’ legendary fight over control of Facebook with its CEO Mark Zuckerberg, their former Harvard classmate. But they now want to be “frenemies” with a mutual goal of promoting mainstream crypto adoption.
Plus, the twins are aiming to diversify Gemini’s token offerings by 2020. They recently applied for a broker-dealer license through the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, which would allow Gemini to list digital securities.
So far, only one crypto exchange, Coinbase, has joined the Libra Association, whose ranks also include traditional financial players such as PayPal, Visa and Mastercard and VC firms such as Union Square Ventures and Andreessen Horowitz. (Crypto custodian Xapo is also a member.)

Bitcoin (BTC) bolstered its already bullish technical setup with a move above $13,000 on Wednesday.
The top cryptocurrency by market capitalization rose to $13,154 in the Asian trading hours, the highest level since June 27, according to Bitstamp data.
With the move to two-week highs, BTC has recovered 85 percent of the sell-off from $13,880 to $9,614 seen in seven days to July 2.

Have anything to say? Make sure to leave your comment in the comments section down below!
submitted by rokkex to Rokkex [link] [comments]

sites

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submitted by Quippykisset to peaceCorpsCoding [link] [comments]

The best crypto and blockchain podcasts of 2019

For anyone who it interested in learning more about investing, crypto, finance, blockchain, and entrepreneurship can checkout this list I made of the top podcasts to follow in 2019 with some selected episodes chosen from each one:

Off The Chain With Anthony Pompliano
Host Anthony Pompliano talks to some of the most respected names in crypto and Wall Street to find out how intelligent investors from the new and old financial system are thinking about digital assets.
Top Episodes:
CZ, Founder and CEO of Binance: Binance and the Future of Global Crypto Regulation
Murad Mahmudov: The Ultimate Bitcoin Argument
Travis Kling: The Secrets of A Crypto Trader

Unchained: Your No-Hype Resource for All Things Crypto
This weekly, hour-long podcast with host Laura Shin dives deep into the people building the decentralized internet, the details of this technology that could underpin our future, and some of the thorniest topics in crypto, such as regulation, security and privacy.
Top Episodes:
Vitalik Buterin, Creator of Ethereum, On The Big Guy vs. The Little Guy
Naval Ravikant On How Crypto Is Squeezing VCs, Hindering Regulators, and Bringing Users Choice
Blockchain 101 with Andreas Antonoloulos

What Grinds My Gears
From Meltem Demirors and Jill Carlson, What Grinds My Gears is a podcast about the bizarre and buzzworthy happenings in the world of cryptocurrency. Each week, they delve into one key theme in crypto, and examine this theme through a broader financial, political, and cultural lens to learn from the past, understand the present, and explore the future.
Top Episodes:
An Unfetted Orgy Of Capitalism
It’s All About The DEX, Baby!
Tarred & Tethered

What Bitcoin Did
Since the birth of Bitcoin in 2009, a new class of Crypto assets built using the innovative design of the blockchain is disrupting technology and financial markets. In this podcast you will hear host Peter McCormack speak with crypto traders, miners, venture capitalist, investors, technical developers, CEOs, journalist and other people driving forward the growth of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.
Link To Listen
Top Episodes:
Andreas Antonopoulos: What Happens When Bitcoin Takes Over?
Peter Van Valkenburg on Lightning & The Law
Tuur Demeester on Why Bitcoin Is In Heavy Accumulation

Untold Stories with Charlie Shrem
Host Charlie Shrem dives deep into the lives and personal histories of some of crypto’s most influential leaders. A focus on personal stories weaves together a nuanced, untold narrative of how the crypto movement truly came to be.
Top Episodes:
J. Maurice “Wiz” — The Real Story of Mt. Gox & How to Become a Self-Sovereign Bitcoin Miner
Arianna Simpson — Why Founders Shouldn’t Think About an Exit & Becoming BitGo’s 3rd Employee
Steven Nerayoff — Crypto as a Disruptive Technology & Governments Debasing Their Own Currencies

Tales From The Crypt
Tales from the Crypt is a podcast hosted by Marty Bent about Bitcoin. Join Marty, Editor in Chief of “the best newsletter in crypto”, as he sits down to discuss Bitcoin with interesting people.
Top Episodes:
Tales from the Crypt: Pierre Rochard Pt. I
Tales from the Crypt #3: Santiago Siri
Tales from the Crypt Ep1: The History of Bitcoin Pt. 1

The Token Daily with Soona Amhaz
Host soona amhaz sits down with the movers and shakers of the crypto industry to discuss the big ideas they spend their days thinking about. Soona and her guests examine everything from industry trends, to what books they’re reading, to human psychology and investing.
Top Episodes:
Taylor Pearson, Author of The End of Jobs: Markets Are Eating the World
Dani Grant, Analyst at Union Square Ventures: The VC Outlook on Crypto’s Trends and Future
Tony Sheng, Independent Analyst: A Writer’s Take on Bitcoin Lore

The Flippening
Flippening is for cryptocurrency investors. Each week host Clay Collins discusses the cryptocurrency economy, new investment strategies for maximizing returns, and stories from the front lines of financial disruption. Flippening is for a new class of investors that were not part of the financial services world before bitcoin, but got into the finance because of their passion for cryptoassets, blockchain, altcoins, and distributed ledger technology.
Top Episodes:
Strategies for Accumulating BTC (Instead of USD) w/ Tuur Demeester from Adamant Capital
The Economics of Cryptoasset Markets w/ Professor Stephen McKeon
Bootstrapping A Crypto Nation State From Scratch, w/ Eric Meltzer of INBlockchain

The Chain Reaction Podcast
Host Tom Shaughnessy of Delphi Digital converses with the top names in crypto and blockchain.
Top Episodes:
ConsenSys’ Joe Lubin: Ethereum’s Competition Isn’t Even Close
Delphi Digital’s March Analyst Call — Ethereum, Enjin and Our Short Term Bitcoin Outlook
Vision Hill Group’s Scott Army: Digital Asset Management of the Future

a16z Podcast
The a16z Podcast discusses tech and culture trends, news, and the future — especially as ‘software eats the world’. It features industry experts, business leaders, and other interesting thinkers and voices from around the world. This podcast is produced by Andreessen Horowitz (aka “a16z”), a Silicon Valley-based venture capital firm.
Top Episodes:
What Time Is It? From Technical to Product to Sales CEO
Principles and Algorithms for Work and Life
Five Open Problems Toward Building a Blockchain Computer

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto
Events in crypto take place at warp speed. This weekly crypto podcast reveals how the marquee names in crypto are reacting to the week’s top headlines. With host Laura Shin, the guests also discuss what they’re thinking about these days and reveal what they believe is on the horizon in crypto. Disclosure: Laura is a nocoiner.
Top Episodes:
To the Moon and Back With Polychain’s Olaf Carlson-Wee
Don Wilson of DRW Holdings on What’s Been Driving 2018’s Crypto Downturn
Hu Liang of Omniex on What Institutional Players Are Planning to Do in Crypto

The Unhashed Podcast
Unhashed breaks down the latest in Bitcoin news and developments and puts them into terms everyone can understand. Expect to be both entertained and educated about cryptocurrencies and blockchain. How do hardware wallets work and do they really keep you safe? Which crypto exchanges pose the greatest risk to the bitcoin ecosystem? Does Litecoin help or hinder bitcoin development? Expect the answers to these and many other questions from the Unhashed professionals offering different perspectives to all the blockchain issues you care about!
Top Episodes:
The Very Rich, Very Patient Binance Hacker
Bitcoin Goes High Fidelity
Initiating Unhash

The Scoop
The Block’s team, led by Frank Chaparro, draw out the freshest and deepest insights about digital assets from traditional Wall Street, crypto native, Fortune 500 and many other crypto ecosystem leaders. It’s light, fun and informative brain food!
Top Episodes:
A Conversation with Mark Yusko, CEO and CIO of Morgan Creek Capital Management
A Conversation with Stephen Palley, Partner at Anderson Kill
A Conversation with Emilie Choi, VP Business and Data, Coinbase

Base Layer
Base Layer with host David Nage will be providing insights from founders and investors in the base layer of cryptoassets. Simplifying complex projects and the technology being developed, from interoperability to relayers and more — who is building the future, why are they and how are they doing it.
Top Episodes:
Base Layer Episode 028 — Zaki Manian (SkuChain, Cosmos, Tendermint)
Base Layer Episode 026 — Diogo Monica (Co — Founder, Anchorage)
Base Layer Episode 032 — Alexander Skidanov (NEAR)

Blockchain Innovation: Interviewing The Brightest Minds In Blockchain
Blockchain Innovation is where host Frederick Munawa interviews the brightest minds in Blockchain and cryptocurrency — entrepreneurs, executives, and top academics — to discuss present and future applications of Blockchain Technology. Why? To determine how Blockchain can be used to increase profits, cut costs, and disrupt traditional industries and business models — so you can borrow their strategies, tools, and tactics for your own success. Join Frederick every Tuesday to learn how the brightest minds in Blockchain are pushing the envelope with Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs) and token sales, public blockchains, private blockchains, Bitcoin, Ethereum, Hyperledger, smart contracts, and much more.
Top Episodes:
Why Bitcoin Should Hard Fork With Roger Ver
How Blockchain Assets Are Changing The World With Erik Voorhees
Blockchain Meets Artificial Intelligence with Dr. Ben Goertzel

Blockchain Insider
Blockchain Insider, hosted by Simon Taylor and Colin Platt is a dedicated podcast specializing in Bitcoin, Blockchain and distributed ledger technology (DLT). Simon and Colin break down the week’s news with expertise and enthusiasm for the blockchain and digital currency sector. Since the price of Bitcoin has rocketed, and Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin have become household names, Blockchain Insider has charted their rise in a way that’s accessible to new listeners.
Top Episodes:
Ep. 42. Santander Makes Ripples and Charles Hoskinson Shares His Vision of Cardano
Ep. 27. XRP’s Ripple effect and Blockchain use cases
Ep. 43. Sexism in Crypto, Pornhub takes Verge, and Binance Denies the Dollar

Let’s Talk Crypto
Have you ever heard of digital currencies like bitcoin, ethereum, and buzzwords like blockchain, cryptocurrencies and mining? Don’t know what it all means or how to get started? Let’s Talk Crypto with Barry Moore and Tom Galeski breaks it all down in easy to understand terms and helps you “learn and earn” in the age of cryptocurrencies.
Top Episodes:
006: Altcoins
017: Fiat & Crypto
010: Proof of Work vs. Proof of Stake

Blockchain 2025
Blockchain is a technology that will disrupt nearly every industry. Host Matt Aaron and Blake Moore explore one industry in every episode. How will blockchain change art, music, or online advertising? What projects are already underway? Listen & find out.
Top Episodes:
Online Ads — Publishers and Advertisers vs. Centralized Platforms
Music Biz — Can Artists Have More Money + Freedom?
Crypto Debit Cards — A Bridge to the Future? TenX, Monaco, Comit

IBM Blockchain Pulse
Host and blockchain-evangelist Matt Hooper engages with the planet’s most dynamic blockchain thought-leaders, explorers and innovators to discover the countless new ways blockchain is leaping from theory to reality: From entertainment to identity, from payments to secure supply-chain transparency.
Top Episodes:
Making Cross-Border Payments Seamless — IBM Blockchain and Stellar’s Collaboration That is Bringing Commercial Payments to the Financial World
A Blockchain Origin Story and Enabling Complete Ownership With Blockchain
The Future of Protecting Your Wallet and Identity: Blockchain Identity and Digital Credentials, with Adam Gunther and Drummond Reed

Messari’s Unqualified Opinions
Unqualified Opinions is a podcast hosted by Messari’s CEO Ryan Selkis featuring candid, fast-paced interviews with crypto’s top builders and investors.
Top Episodes:
Bill Barhydt, CEO & Founder of Abra
Anthony Pompliano, Founder at Morgan Creek Digital
Unlock Protocol CEO Julien Genestoux
submitted by RndmWrdCombntn to podcasts [link] [comments]

List of Scott's most influential twitter followers

It seems like Scott/SSC has gotten much more mainstream recognition over the past year, so I was curious to know who the most influential SSC readers are now. Using twitter follower data for this isn't perfect (follower count is not a perfect proxy for influence, not all SSC readers follow the twitter account, etc.), but it's the best I could think of and I figured it would be a fun exercise regardless.
As an aside, a few interesting stats I learned about Scott's twitter followers (scraped on 12/30/17):
  1. Scott is followed by exactly two members of Congress: Justin Amash (Republican) and Jim Himes (Democrat)
  2. Scott has 351 bluecheck followers
  3. Of the top 100 most-followed followers, the gender breakdown (by my count) is 82 men vs 8 women (along with 10 organization or anonymous accounts). Among the top 50, it's 43 men and 1 woman (Liv Boeree)
  4. 385 followers (2% of the total) have bios including either "bitcoin", "ethereum", "crypto" or "blockchain"
  5. There are 67 followers whose bios include either "@Google", "@ Google", "at Google", or "Googler"
Note: When constructing the top 100 below, I excluded accounts that had extremely large Following counts, since I wanted the list to just consist of (likely) actual SSC readers. My exact rule was to exclude any account that follows >20K, include any that follows <10K, and include accounts in the 10K-20K range iff their following/follower ratio was less than 10% (this last condition was mostly just because I wanted to keep @pmarca on the list).
Anyway, below is the top 100. I also constructed lists for Eliezer, Robin Hanson, and gwern, and I can post those in the comments if anyone's interested.
Ranking Twitter Name Full Name Bio Bluecheck Follower Count Following Count
1 @NateSilver538 Nate Silver Editor-in-Chief, @FiveThirtyEight. Author, The Signal and the Noise (http://amzn.to/QdyFYV). Sports/politics/food geek. 1 2860782 1051
2 @ezraklein Ezra Klein Founder and editor-at-large, http://Vox.com. Come work with us! http://bit.ly/1ToAmQ8 1 2277052 1112
3 @timoreilly Tim O'Reilly Founder and CEO, O'Reilly Media. Watching the alpha geeks, sharing their stories, helping the future unfold. 1 1988716 1829
4 @paulg Paul Graham 1 1066366 322
5 @SamHarrisOrg Sam Harris Author of The End of Faith, The Moral Landscape, Waking Up, and other bestselling books published in over 20 languages. Host of the Waking Up… 1 974855 229
6 @techreview MIT Tech Review MIT Technology Review equips its audiences with the intelligence to understand a world shaped by technology. 1 794095 3367
7 @pmarca Marc Andreessen 1 672740 16319
8 @cdixon Chris Dixon programming, philosophy, history, internet, startups, investing 1 572260 3320
9 @RealTimeWWII WW2 Tweets from 1939 I livetweet the 2nd World War, as it happened on this day in 1939 & for 6 years to come (2nd time around). Created by Alwyn Collinson,… 0 516803 459
10 @VitalikButerin Vitalik Buterin See https://about.me/vitalik_buterin 1 458582 154
11 @Tribeca Tribeca Great stories from the greatest storytellers. 1 409581 18678
12 @bhorowitz Ben Horowitz Author of Ben's Blog (http://www.bhorowitz.com) and HarperBusiness book, THE HARD THING ABOUT HARD THINGS http://www.amazon.com/Hard-Thing-About-Things-Building-ebook/dp/B00DQ845EA/ref=sr_1_1… 1 405820 255
13 @mattyglesias Matthew Yglesias Fake news. Bad takes. Dad jokes. We’re actually on the Bad Place. 1 372341 754
14 @naval Naval Present. 0 339469 478
15 @SwiftOnSecurity SwiftOnSecurity I make stupid jokes, talk systems security, https://DecentSecurity.com + http://GotPhish.com, write Scifi, sysadmin, & use Oxford commas. Sprezzatura. 0 211672 7530
16 @alexismadrigal Alexis C. Madrigal staff writer @TheAtlantic in the real world, these just people with ideas Mexican, Oakland, Earthseed 1 203540 5682
17 @ScottAdamsSays Scott Adams Win Bigly: http://amzn.to/2myAGon 1 202042 788
18 @Khanoisseur Adam Khan Majordomo; Stuff at @Google @Twitter @SpaceX @Apple Exposing Trump https://www.gofundme.com/VolunteerJournalism… *Turn notifications on for breaking Trump… 0 183964 9359
19 @felixsalmon Felix Salmon Host and editor, Cause & Effect 1 180414 1832
20 @fmanjoo Farhad Manjoo (feat. Drake) NYT. DMs are open. signal: 4156836738. [email protected]. Instagram/Snapchat: fmanjoo 1 167592 4095
21 @VsauceTwo Vsauce2 Being Human. personal twitter: @kevleeb 0 151795 279
22 @russian_market Russian Market Swiss Financial Blogger. In Bitcoin we trust. 1 148866 939
23 @AaronDayAtlas Aaron Day CEO @Salucorp, Chairman @stark_360. #entrepreneur #btc #blockchain #healthcare #paleo #tech #dad Former candidate for #USSenate #ENTJ 0 133389 2075
24 @justinamash Justin Amash I defend #liberty and explain every vote at http://facebook.com/justinamash • 'Laws must be general, equal, and certain.' —F.A. Hayek 1 131997 5376
25 @Liv_Boeree Liv Boeree Poker player & Team Pokerstars Pro. Physics creature. Aspiring rationalist. Mountain goat. [email protected] 1 125366 451
26 @MaxCRoser Max Roser Researcher @UniOfOxford – Follow me for data visualizations of long-term trends of living standards – mostly from my web publication: http://www.OurWorldinData.org 1 114045 583
27 @Jonathan_Blow Jonathan Blow Game designer of Braid and The Witness. Partner in IndieFund. 0 112827 68
28 @andrewchen Andrew Chen Growth: @uber. Writer: http://andrewchen.co. Plus one: @briannekimmel 0 111077 6288
29 @charlescwcooke Charles C. W. Cooke Editor of National Review Online. Classical liberal. Immigrant. Jack’s Dad. Wino. ‘The American is the Englishman left to himself.’ 1 110071 872
30 @AlanEyre1 Alan Eyre Diplomat, U.S. State Dept, Energy Resources Bureau. Middle East/Asia Energy; ایران. RT doesn't =endorsement; 'likes' don't necessarily=likes, often… 1 106947 3514
31 @karpathy Andrej Karpathy Director of AI at Tesla. Previously a Research Scientist at OpenAI, and CS PhD student at Stanford. I like to train Deep Neural Nets on large datasets. 1 106643 445
32 @JamesADamore James Damore Nerd centrist interested in open discussions and improving the world by fixing perverse incentive structures. Author of the pro-diversity … 1 94580 210
33 @SherwoodStrauss Ethan Strauss Podcasting 1 88258 1204
34 @james_clear James Clear Author, weightlifter and travel photographer in 25+ countries. Over 400,000 people subscribe to my weekly newsletter on how to build better habits. 1 87968 218
35 @nk from the future Wealth and personal achievement expert 0 81712 591
36 @benthompson Ben Thompson AuthoFounder of @stratechery. Host of @exponentfm. @notechben for sports. @monkbent on other networks. Home on the Internet. 1 78746 1267
37 @matthewherper Matthew Herper Forbes reporter covering science and medicine 1 78698 2111
38 @JeremyCMorgan Jeremy Morgan Tech Blogger, Hacker, Pluralsight Author, and Volunteer Firefighter. Once held the world record for being the youngest person alive 0 78601 7365
39 @balajis Balaji S. Srinivasan CEO (http://Earn.com) and Board Partner (@a16z). I hear this Bitcoin thing might be kind of a big deal. You can reach me at http://earn.com/balajis. 1 70707 2936
40 @patrickc Patrick Collison Fallibilist, optimist. Stripe CEO. 1 68709 1875
41 @matthew_d_green Matthew Green I teach cryptography at Johns Hopkins. 0 68434 594
42 @delong Brad DeLong 🖖🏻 I'm trying to be smart, knowledgable, funny, and well-wishing. You try too--at least 2 of 4. Low volume: 1+ per day... 0 67968 1578
43 @flantz Frank Lantz game designer 0 66090 278
44 @MYSTIQUEWEST MYSTIQUE NYC The Mystique Gentlemen’s Strip Club offers the best in adult entertainment in New York City. With unique stage design, full bars and the most beautiful dancers. 0 64881 332
45 @AceofSpadesHQ TheOne&OnlyExpert I'm not #TheExpert, or the expert parodying #TheExpert. I'm the real expert. 0 64872 1464
46 @btaylor Bret Taylor President, Chief Product Officer of @Salesforce. Previously CEO Quip, CTO Facebook, CEO FriendFeed, co-creator Google Maps. Stanford fan, @Twitter… 1 64829 687
47 @wycats Yehuda Katz Tilde Co-Founder, OSS enthusiast and world traveler. 1 63933 849
48 @jahimes Jim Himes Connecticut Congressman. Reader. Runner. Swimmer. And I make maple syrup. 1 62820 411
49 @abnormalreturns Tadas Viskanta Financial Educator, Author and Editor of Abnormal Returns. 0 61693 413
50 @BrendanNyhan Brendan Nyhan @Dartmouth political science professor, @UpshotNYT contributor, and @BrightLineWatch co-organizer. Before: @CJR / Spinsanity / All the President'… 1 61508 6149
51 @matt_levine Matt Levine da, wo Menschen arbeiten, wird es immer Fehler geben 1 61314 990
52 @BretWeinstein Bret Weinstein Professor in Exile If we don't harness evolution, it will harness us. 1 61049 536
53 @gaberivera Gabe Rivera Blame me for @Techmeme and @mediagazer. Nicer than my tweets. Often sarcastic. DMs are open. 2+2â‰5. Retweets are endorphins. 1 59927 5599
54 @SarahTheHaider Sarah Haider Promotes free-speech, human rights, liberalism, atheism. Director of Outreach,Ex-Muslims of North America. Pakistani by birth, American by… 0 59574 292
55 @TheInfinite_T ✨Infinite_T✨ NSFW Send GoogleWallet to [email protected] pls send all your tokens to http://mfc.im/infinite_t/t Wishlist: http://a.co/8taURYD 0 59061 645
56 @cblatts Chris Blattman Political economist studying conflict, crime, and poverty, and @UChicago Professor @HarrisPolicy and @PearsonInst. I blog at … 0 57670 2445
57 @jamestaranto James Taranto Editorial Features Editor, in charge of @WSJ op-ed pages. Best of the Web columnist 2000-17. 1 56733 174
58 @nitashatiku Nitasha Tiku Senior writer @Wired covering Silicon Valley [email protected], DM for Signal 1 56133 4327
59 @DKThomp Derek Thompson Writer at @TheAtlantic. Author of HIT MAKERS. Talker on NPR's @hereandnow. Economics of work and play. derek[at]theatlantic[dot]com 1 53387 1116
60 @aliamjadrizvi Ali A. Rizvi Pakistani-Canadian author of The Atheist Muslim (SMP/Macmillan). Amazon order link below. Co-host of @SecularJihadist podcast. Contact:… 1 52806 784
61 @RameshPonnuru Ramesh Ponnuru @NRO, @BV, @AEI, @CBS. Husband of @aprilponnuru. 1 51721 613
62 @JYuter Rabbi Josh Yuter "For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways" Is. 55:8. Jewish stuff + bad jokes. All opinions subject to change. 1 50731 2599
63 @meganphelps Megan Phelps-Roper “You're just a human being, my dear, sweet child.” Speaking requests: [email protected] Contact: [email protected] 1 49678 792
64 @albertwenger Albert Wenger VC at http://usv.com 1 49107 1794
65 @paulbloomatyale Paul Bloom Psychologist who studies and writes about human nature—including morality, pleasure, and religion 1 48579 391
66 @conor64 Conor Friedersdorf Staff writer at The Atlantic, founding editor of The Best of Journalism–subscribe here: https://www.ponyexpress.io/subscribe/thebestofjournalism… 1 46977 1405
67 @EricRWeinstein Eric Weinstein Managing director @ Thiel Capital. Some assembly required. Spelling not included. May contain math. Tweets are my own. 1 46263 850
68 @adamdangelo Adam D'Angelo CEO of Quora 1 45545 526
69 @robbystarbuck Robby Starbuck Director + Producer + Founder at RSM Creative - Husband to @imatriarch - Dad to 3 Kids + 2 Dogs - Futurist - Cuban American - Fan of Civilized Debate 1 45308 1842
70 @clairlemon Claire Lehmann Principle before affiliation. Founder, editor http://quillette.com. Contact me at http://earn.com/clairelehmann 1 45305 2000
71 @tombennett71 Tom Bennett Director of researchED- https://researched.org.uk Chair of @educationgovuk Behaviour group. Free training available here http://www.tombennetttraining.co.uk 1 43859 3698
72 @m2jr Mike Maples The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep,And miles to go before I sleep,And miles to go before I sleep.-Robert Frost 0 43629 3915
73 @DavidDidau David Didau Education writer and speaker. Ginger. #PsychBook OUT NOW! https://goo.gl/xyDIjO; #WrongBook still available: http://amzn.to/1Opyach 0 43531 1092
74 @ByronTau Byron Tau congress et al. for @wsj. interested in law, lobbying, nat'l security, investigations, gov't ethics and . contact me securely: http://bit.ly/2s2HTfG 1 43026 2699
75 @MichaelKitces MichaelKitces One nerd’s perspective on the financial planning world… CFP, #LifelongLearner, Entrepreneur-In-Denial, Advisor #FinTech, & publisher of the Nerd’s Eye View blog 1 42304 459
76 @rahulkapil Rahul Kapil Come to observe. Stay to play. 0 41987 975
77 @michaelbatnick Irrelevant Investor Long-distance reader 0 41620 1076
78 @yegg Gabriel Weinberg CEO & Founder, @DuckDuckGo. Co-author, Traction. I want to publish zines and rage against machines. DM for Signal. 1 39470 151
79 @Jesse_Livermore Jesse Livermore Trader, Speculator, Bucketeer 0 39190 4459
80 @iconominet ICONOMI Digital Assets Management Platform for the Decentralised Economy 0 39030 1942
81 @IKucukparlak İlker Küçükparlak Psikiyatrist http://ihtisastramvayi.com 0 38018 757
82 @vdare Virginia Dare The Twitter account for the editors of VDARE. Featured at the 2016 Republican National Convention 0 37723 4429
83 @juliagalef Julia Galef SF-based writer & speaker focused on reasoning, judgment, and the future of humanity. Host of the Rationally Speaking podcast (@rspodcast) 1 37530 340
84 @nicknotned Nick Denton Internet publisher 1 36708 2524
85 @JeremyMcLellan Jeremy McLellan Standup Comedian, Papist-in-training, biryani extremist, alleged member of the Muslim Cousinhood, US ambassador to the Pindi Boyz, spy pigeon trainer 1 36253 1538
86 @collision John Collison Co-founder of @stripe. 0 35995 1290
87 @narcissawright ♕ Narcissa fledgling seer 1 35375 1266
88 @panzer Matthew Panzarino Editor-in-Chief, TechCrunch. Telecom stories killed: 0. PGP Key https://keybase.io/panzer 1 35162 2902
89 @EconTalker Russell Roberts How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life (http://amzn.to/1o72lYh), EconTalk host, econ novelist, co-creator of Keynes/Hayek rap videos, http://www.wonderfulloaf.org/ 0 34611 669
90 @nktpnd Ankit Panda Senior Editor @Diplomat_APAC in NYC. Thinking/writing/speaking on global security, politics, and economics. Via @WilsonSchool. Views mine & RTâ‰â€¦ 1 34041 995
91 @Official_Quame Kwame A. A Opoku Futurist• Global Business Speaker, Founder @fobaglobal, @wefestafrica, @ideafactorylive • CEO Mary&Mary LLC • Entrepreneur • Tedx Speaker •Influencer 0 33924 3526
92 @dylanmatt Dylan Matthews I know, I know, I don't like me either. Retweets are proposals of marriage. 1 33262 5579
93 @Jonnymagic00 Jon Finkel I'm a magic player who also manages a hedge fund. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Finkel 0 33234 284
94 @Heminator Mark Hemingway "After all these years of professional experience, why can’t I write good?" Senior Writer @WeeklyStandard. Husband of @MZHemingway. 1 33034 4877
95 @sweenzor Onson Sweemey 0 32044 5288
96 @PhilosophersEye Philosopher's Eye Philosophy updates, pop culture, fun stuff, and links to resources from the Wiley Blackwell Philosophy Team. 0 31931 6503
97 @VladZamfir Vlad Zamfir Absurdist, troll. 0 31764 418
98 @m_clem Michael Clemens Fellow @[email protected]_bonn. My views only. Assoc. Editor @JPopEcon & @WorldDevJournal. Author of @WallsofNations, coming in 2018.… 1 31746 3650
99 @RudyHavenstein Rudolf E. Havenstein ReichsBank®President 1908-1923; Central Bank consultant. 'My way of joking is to tell the truth' - GB Shaw. Tweets solely for my own amusemen… 0 31115 1293
100 @tikhon Tikhon Bernstam CEO & Founder of Parse (YC S'11, acquired by Facebook for $85M in 2013). Founder @Scribd (YC S'06). @ycombinator alum. 0 31030 5184
submitted by disumbrationist to slatestarcodex [link] [comments]

Every computer is the Bitcoin computer

Bitcoin doesn't require any special hardware, as it can be used on any device which can do computations. To make a Bitcoin transaction you need to create a ECDSA signature, which is just math, something which all computers do well. You can do it both on resource-constrained like smart cards (think SIM cards) and on large servers alike.
The idea that you need a special Bitcoin computer to use Bitcoin is outright harmful, as it limits your choices and dupes you into buying overpriced proprietary hardware which gives the vendor more control of what you can and cannot do. This is very much against the spirit of Bitcoin which can thrive only as an open system.
So yeah, that thing 21 inc is trying to sell makes no sense, whatsoever.
But a lot of people think that "there might be something in it", let me go through the theories of why this device makes sense:
  1. "It is a dev kit!". Let me guess, you aren't a programmer. Or if you're a programmer, you're a shitty programmer and should be ashamed of yourself. You do not need any dev kit for Bitcoin, all you need is open source software (and, maybe, some internet services, optionally). When I wanted to try to do something Bitcoin related back in 2011, all I needed was to download bitcoind and install it on my $10/month VPS. Then I looked through RPC API call list and made a Bitcoin-settled futures exchange. The whole thing took me only a week. I didn't need to pay $400 for a devkit. Learning how to work with bitcoind took less than a day. There are hundreds of Bitcoin companies and thousands of hobbyist working on Bitcoin projects, none of them needed any sort of a dev kit.
  2. "It is useful because it has APIs and pre-installed software!" No, see above. If needed, pre-installed software can be delivered in a form of a virtual machine (e.g. VirtualBox, VMware, etc), no need for a physical device.
  3. "It is useful because it comes with a micropayment service/API". Nope. These things can be done in software, no need for custom hardware. Obviously, a micropayment system can be more widely adopted when it is open. If it is tied to custom hardware (which I doubt) then you have a vendor lock-in which is exactly the thing we're trying to avoid with Bitcoin.
  4. "it comes with pre-installed marketplace". So what, we have marketplaces such as OpenBazaar. If there are useful features in the 21 inc's marketplace we can replicated them in open source software.
  5. "It's convenient for users!" Are you saying that a $400 device which you need to be connected to a laptop is more convenient than a service which can run in a browser?
  6. "It might offer better security". We already have devices such as Trezor which can protect bitcoins from unsecure operating system. Trezor costs much less than $400 and is actually useful. Even though it was done by a small company without much capital.
  7. "It can be used for applications like a reputation system, etc." When telecom companies wanted an ability to differentiate between users, they created smartcard-based SIM cards. This technology is many decades old. Using Bitcoin for a reputation system is a bad idea, as it is not designed for that. If device holds 1000 satoshi to give it an identity weight, a guy who has 1 bitcoin can impersonate 10000 such devices. It just not going to work.
  8. "A constant stream of bitcoins it mines is convenient for users." User has to pay for this device, he might as well just buy bitcoins. If it is necessary for bitcoins to be attached to hardware, this can be done using a tiny dongle which costs less than $1 to manufacture, or a smart card.
  9. "But this device got backed by VCs and large companies, there must be something to it, we are just too stupid to comprehend its greatness". Well...
There is, indeed, a very simple explanation of this device's existnce: Balaji's reality distortion field. He is a prominent VC, so it was relatively easy to convince others that it's a worthy idea. The big vision behind it -- the financial network of devices -- is actually great. And then there is a question of execution. A guy like Balaji is supposed to be an expert in assessing feasibility of execution. So, as we can guess, investors trusted him. As many VCs tell, they invest in people. They cannot examine nitty-gritty technical details, but just look at skills, track record, etc.
So the fact that it got large investments and generates a lot of hype doesn't mean much, there was a plenty of such companies during dotcom boom.
It's quite like :CueCat. As we now know, an ability to scan a printed code and open a web page which it points to is very useful, a lot of people use QR codes, they are ubiquitous. This was exactly the vision behind CueCat. But it was implemented as a dedicated hardware device, not as a smartphone app, as there were no smartphones at that time. So after a lot of hype and aggressive marketing the company failed, but just few years later their vision became realized in QR reader apps.
Hardware becomes increasingly irrelevant. As Mark Andreessen, Balaji's partner, [once said], software is eating the world. Solving problems which can be solved software using custom hardware is just silly.
Balaji talks about internet-of-things applications where devices mine bitcoins and use them to buy services they need to function. Well, in the end, user pays for that, as he pays for physical chips and electricity. It would be more efficient for him to pay directly than to use this mining-based scheme. And it's possible to do so using software. E.g. imagine you have a lot of smart devices which use external services in your home. It would be nice if you can just aggregate the bill and pay it off automatically, say $2/month. Why only $2? Well, if there is a device consuming $20/month, it needs some serious mining abilities, so it will cost much more than $20 in electricity bills...
Maybe 21 inc will eventually pivot into purely software solutions, they have a lot of money to play with. But the current generation of devices they make just makes no sense, whatsoever, and people who try to find something useful in them just waste their time.
EDIT: One plausible case for using custom hardware is a possibility of off-chain microtransactions using trusted hardware. Not unlike MintChip conceptually. But size of the device as well as its price is puzzling in this case, as this can be implemented (and was already implemented) in smart card form factor.
submitted by killerstorm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A few Endorsements and a mention by DataDash

Wanted to let everyone know we got a couple of cool endorsements for 0xBTC. Nice to see some industry folks taking notice. Especially in this silly mass /biz/ FUD.
First
"The 0xBTC community has been an amazing community to work closely with during the early days of Enclaves DEX. With a unique approach to token generation they have pioneered minable tokens on the Ethereum network creating a new class of token which is both equitably distributed and technically innovative." https://medium.com/@adam.dossa
By: Adam Dossa (founder of Enclaves and lead developer of Polymath).
Second
"Honestly, 0xBTC is the most interesting implementation of the Bitcoin Whitepaper since Bitcoin. If you haven't read the whitepaper, do so now. It raises some incredible ideas." https://twitter.com/rleshnestatus/989389075399327744?s=21
By: Robert Leshner (CEO of Compound - which Coinbase just invested in as well as top VC Andreessen Horowitz).
https://techcrunch.com/2018/05/16/cryptocurrency-compound-interest/
Third
Not an endorsement but 0xBTC was mentioned on Datadash on his 6/22/2018 livestream. https://youtu.be/zV4e8m0KzXc (6 minute mark).
Fourth
If anyone is worried due to the recent price drop remember this... "Be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful."
By: Warren Buffet (Crypto is not his thing but the advice is golden).
There will be another community update likely towards the end of next week. Stay strong and remember buy low!!!
- Crypturk
submitted by crypturk to 0xbitcoin [link] [comments]

More funds testing water on crypto-related assets

More funds testing water on crypto-related assets

Anthony Pompliano sees an ‘enormous upside’ for returns from direct investment in cryptocurrencies despite the worrying volatility. ALEX FLYNN/BLOOMBERG
BY DANIELLE WALKER · MARCH 4, 2019
Institutional investors, including public pension funds, have begun taking bets on fledgling funds, which invest heavily in cryptocurrency and blockchain-related companies.
But these funds also could invest directly in cryptocurrencies as well, which some industry sources argue are not a viable investment option for institutions, primarily due to volatility and valuation concerns.
In Virginia, the $4.2 billion Fairfax County Employees’ Retirement System and the $1.5 billion Fairfax County Police Officers Retirement System became the first known public pension plan to commit to a dedicated fund that invests primarily in blockchain technology firms. The investments were “deliberately sized to be a small portion of each system’s assets,” Jeff Weiler, the executive director of Fairfax County Retirement Systems, wrote in a February note published on the system’s website. The employees’ fund allocated $10 million and the police fund $11 million, mandates representing less than 1% of each fund.
Both investments were made in the Morgan Creek Blockchain Opportunities Fund, managed by Morgan Creek Digital Assets, a subsidiary of Chapel Hill, N.C.-based Morgan Creek Capital Management LLC.
While 85% of the Morgan Creek fund is invested in blockchain technology firms, up to 15% of the fund can be invested directly into cryptocurrencies, Mr. Weiler wrote, adding that the fund currently “has no exposure to any cryptocurrencies.”
Since June, other unidentified institutions, including a university endowment, hospital system, insurance company and private founda- tion have invested in the fund, said New York-based Anthony Pompliano, founder and partner at Morgan Creek Digital Assets.
Every investor in the fund is under the same structure, where up to 15% of the fund can be allocated to liquid cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoin, Mr. Pompliano said. The Fairfax plans made their allocations to the $40 million fund at the end of the year, he added.
“The fundraising target was $25 million, and we oversubscribed to $40 million. The fund is done fundraising and will not take any more investors,” Mr. Pompliano said.
“That 15% is kind of an artificial cap because we want to make sure we are sizing the liquid investments inside of the portfolio according to the risk-return profile that liquid cryptocurrencies present,” Mr. Pompliano said. Morgan Creek believes that certain cryptocurrencies, “although they are volatile, have enormous upside and, therefore, we want to make sure that we gain exposure to it. But we want to size it correctly within the portfolio.”
The University of Michigan’s $12 billion endowment committed $3 million in June to a dedicated fund investing in crypto-technology companies, which was created by Menlo Park, Calif.-based venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, according to agenda materials from the university’s Feb. 21 board of regents meeting.
The fund, CNK Fund 1, also received approval for a follow-on investment of an undisclosed amount, the documents show. Follow-on investments do not require approval, only a report to the board, a university spokesman wrote in a February email, declining to provide further information.
Last year, the $29.4 billion Yale University endowment, New Haven, Conn., run by CIO David Swensen, who is known for his bold approach in alternative investing, allocated an undisclosed amount to two cryptocurrency funds, according to an October Bloomberg News report. Mr. Swensen did not respond for comment, and a spokesman for the school declined to confirm whether investments were made into cryptocurrency funds.

Red flags

Giorgio Carlino, a managing director and CIO of the global multiasset team at Allianz Global Investors, New York, said in a phone interview that there are “too many risks involved” in investing in cryptocurrencies to date, with the primary risk being valuation. “As an institutional investor, you should not, you could not actually, explain a position in bitcoin … or any other crypto in your portfolio as an asset allocation.”
“The valuation of the cryptocurrency is not possible as of today,” he said. “They have no income, there’s no intrinsic value, there’s no guarantee by a state or a central bank. It is an interesting concept and I’m fascinated, but it’s not an investment.” But Mr. Carlino does see a case for gaining an exposure to the cryptocurrency industry itself, by way of venture capital investments targeting firms banking on the future of blockchain or so called cryptoassets. But he describes even these investments as “high risk.”
“There are different ways of using cryptocurrencies that are, I see in the future, absolutely there. … J.P. Morgan has made a gigantic investment themselves,” he said.
Last month, J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., New York, became the first U.S. bank to create and successfully test a digital coin representing a fiat currency. “JPM Coin” is a prototype which the bank plans to use to enable payment transfers between institutional customers, such as banks and broker-dealers, using blockchain technology, the company said in a Feb. 14 announcement on its website.
The development comes despite J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon’s noted skepticism of bitcoin, having called it a “fraud,” and going as far as to say he would fire any employee trading the cryptocurrency, Bloomberg News reported in September 2017.
Earlier this year, Andreas Utermann, AllianzGI CEO and global CIO, offered his own thoughts on cryptocurrency investing in a LinkedIn post, writing: “As an asset or a currency … the value of a cryptocurrency is in the eye of the beholder. This makes cryptocurrencies entirely unsuitable for investing in.”
While some in the industry have issued a strong word of caution on framing cryptocurrencies as a legitimate investment option, at least to date, investment consultantCambridge Associates LLC, Boston, has signaled that institutional investors should be exploring opportunities in the cryptocurrency and broader blockchain industry.

Consultant sees opportunity

Cambridge published a white paper Feb. 19 that explained various types of “cryptoasset investments,” including ways investment managers can gain exposure — from purchasing liquid cryptocurrencies, like bitcoin, to making investments in companies “whose returns are connected to the growth of the asset class,” as the “liquidity of these investments is similar to traditional venture capital investments,” the paper said.
“Although the crypto industry remains in its infancy, we think institutional investors should begin exploring it,” the paper noted.
Cambridge cautioned that an allocation to cryptoassets exceeding 1% of a portfolio on a look-through basis “does not appear prudent, even for those comfortable assuming the very high risks involved,” the paper said.
Marcos Veremis, a Cambridge managing director in Arlington, Va., and co-author of the paper, confirmed that many funds which primarily invest in cryptocurrency or blockchain companies also allow direct investment in cryptocurrencies.
“We see many funds build in the option to invest in cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoin,” he wrote in an email.
Cambridge said that, despite challenges such as very high risks in the space, “we believe that it is worthwhile for investors to begin exploring this area today with an eye toward the long term.”
Other consultants, including Aon Hewitt Investment Consulting Inc., CallanLLC andMercer Investment Consulting LLC, have not given institutional clients the go-ahead regarding such investments, though they continue to monitor the field.
“Cryptocurrencies are themselves in a bear market and it would be dangerous to extrapolate future results from a past record that has really shown the ups and downs of this (potential) asset class with bubble-like qualities,” said Zornitza Taleva, a senior hedge fund consultant at Aon Hewitt, New York. “We are skeptical of the role of crypto funds in a global institutional portfolio.”
Mark Wood, Callan vice president and U.S. equity investment consultant, said in an April 2018 research paper that the firm “does not recommend our clients invest in cryptocurrency strategies due to concerns over asset security, liquidity, unclear tax implications and heightened volatility.”

‘We remain cautious’

Mr. Wood said in a February email that Callan still holds this view, but that its stance was “targeted at a direct investment in crypto tokens (or funds that invest in a basket of tokens) — we remain cautious given the heightened volatility, liquidity concerns, high fees and evolving custodial infrastructure.”
Mercer also does not recommend investment in cryptocurrencies or, so-called “cryptoassets,” including venture capital funds that look only at that sector, said Matt Scott, a strategic research specialist based in Bristol, England.
Mercer’s main concerns are related to volatility, Mr. Scott said, but there are also other factors such as environmental, social and governance issues. Some cryptocurrencies have been used “primarily for illegal transactions, like purchasing narcotics or circumventing a country’s capital controls,” for example, he said.
Originally from: https://www.pionline.com/article/20190304/PRINT/190309967/more-funds-testing-water-on-crypto-related-assets#
submitted by dForceProtocol to u/dForceProtocol [link] [comments]

Several Regulated Trading Platforms Intend to List Bitcoin Derivatives, Says CFTC Commissioner

Link to original post on Coinsetter
Mark Wetjen, one of the commissioners of Commodities and Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) today penned an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal revealing that several trading platforms already registered or soon to be registered intend to list Bitcoin derivative contracts. The CFTC has been one of the most active agencies looking into the promise of Bitcoin and what it could do for the financial system. They had a hearing about Bitcoin that attracted some of the key players in the industry and helped the committee learn more about where Bitcoin could head and how best to regulate it without stifling innovation.
CFTC Gets Interested
As Bitcoin gains in popularity, the derivative market around the cryptocurrency is bound to mature as well. Merchants who accept Bitcoin hedge their risk by direct conversion to fiat using payment processors like Coinbase or BitPay. However, these payment processors need to hedge their risk to currency fluctuation as well. The use of derivatives is an easy way to accomplish this, and the CFTC regulates derivatives like swaps in the United States. It should be noted that several exchanges already trade derivative products related to Bitcoin, but they are not regulated.
It is debatable whether Bitcoin is a commodity though, and whether CFTC has the authority to regulate it. From the article, Mr. Wetjen thinks it is –
The definition of “commodity” under the CFTC’s authorizing statute could be read to include Bitcoin, in which case the CFTC would have authority to bring enforcement actions against anyone who attempts to manipulate the virtual currency
Beyond Currencies
The CFTC seems to be one of the few governmental regulatory agencies that sees the potential of Bitcoin technology beyond its simple use as a currency. This was also clear during the hearings that the CFTC organized last year. The CFTC believes that Bitcoin and blockchain technology could rewrite the financial industry. In fact, Mr. Wetjen quotes Marc Andressen, a popular VC who has invested heavily in Bitcoin companies in his opinion article
“If [Bitcoin] works, we can re-implement the entire financial system as a distributed system as opposed to a centralized system. We can reinvent the entire thing.” … Bitcoin or similar technologies can be used as platforms for financial innovation in the digital transfer of currency, securities, contracts and sensitive information. Such innovation could play a fascinating role in the derivatives markets as well as financial services more broadly, as Mr. Andreessen suspects.
The CFTC then seems to believe that Bitcoin has potential to recreate many of the financial industry systems. Several experts also believe that most of the futures regulation that the CFTC oversees could be written as smart contracts on the Bitcoin blockchain, thus making it unnecessary to explicitly regulate Bitcoin futures contracts.
Price Manipulation
The CFTC has also made it clear that if Bitcoin is regulated under its jurisdiction, it will have the authority to take action against Bitcoin price manipulation. Bitcoin price currently is pretty much a wild-west currently with many possible ways to manipulate the price. Therefore, even the products that are approved by the CFTC need to take the price of Bitcoin only from those exchanges that can comply with existing regulation (such as KYC rules).
It seems like the CFTC is keen on seeing Bitcoin succeed and realize its potential while limiting its downside risk by creating a framework under which startups can operate.
Rarely can derivatives regulators anticipate a new market’s potential benefits while devising an appropriate regulatory framework. But virtual currencies such as Bitcoin, and other competing protocols and related technologies, represent such an opportunity.
submitted by bitcoin-news to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Sequoia China, Polychain Lead Blockchain Startup’s $28 Million Round

Sequoia China, Polychain Lead Blockchain Startup’s $28 Million Round
https://preview.redd.it/84ktk83b4pa11.jpg?width=1500&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=983d6872e918f3229f50d0702740716f958de366
Blockchain startup Nervos Network has announced the completion of a $28 million Series A funding round.
The company said on Wednesday that major investors in the round included token-focused hedge fund Polychain and venture capital firm Sequoia China, as well as several China-based blockchain startups like wallet services Bixin and imToken.
The new financing will be put to use expanding Nervos’ product and engineering team with the aim of speeding up the development of its own enterprise blockchain infrastructure, the firm said.
Co-founded by Jan Xie, a former ethereum foundation developer who authored the Ruby implementation, the startup aims to create its own public blockchain network, also called Nervos.
Taking a hybrid approach that combines a public blockchain with another layer of what it calls an “application chain,” Nervos claims the system will resolve the common blockchain issues of scalability and security simultaneously.
The approach is meant to allow companies to develop decentralized applications on top of a secure public network, but run them in the application chain layer — removing the need for enterprises to commit “their entire tech stack to the blockchain.”
Xie said in the announcement:
“While there are undeniable benefits for enterprises that utilize blockchain technology to innovate and improve existing systems, enterprise adoption has been held back by a host of challenges like scalability, security, and complexity.”
The new funding also marks the latest investment move by Sequoia China in the blockchain industry, following recent reports of the venture capital firm’s participation in bitcoin mining giant Bitmain’s Series B round funding.
Earlier this year, Polychain also invested in a Swiss blockchain startup’s $61 million funding round with venture capital giant Andreessen Horowitz. DFINITY Stiftung said the funding would go toward development of its protocol, aimed to support a public decentralized cloud computing platform.
Source
submitted by W12io to u/W12io [link] [comments]

The wilkelvoss are trying to make bitcoin legit according to esquire magazine

Every idea needs a face, even if the faces are illusory simplifications. The country you get is the president you get. The Yankees you get is the shortstop you get. Apple needed Jobs. ISIS needs al-Baghdadi. The moon shot belongs to Bezos. There's nothing under the Facebook sun that doesn't come back to Zuckerberg.
But there is, as yet, no face behind the bitcoin curtain. It's the currency you've heard about but haven't been able to understand. Still to this day nobody knows who created it. For most people, it has something to do with programmable cash and algorithms and the deep space of mathematics, but it also has something to do with heroin and barbiturates and the sex trade and bankruptcies, too. It has no face because it doesn't seem tangible or real. We might align it with an anarchist's riot mask or a highly conceptualized question mark, but those images truncate its reality. Certain economists say it's as important as the birth of the Internet, that it's like discovering ice. Others are sure that it's doomed to melt. In the political sphere, it is the darling of the cypherpunks and libertarians. When they're not busy ignoring it, it scares the living shit out of the big banks and credit-card companies.
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It sparked to life in 2008—when all the financial world prepared for itself the articulate noose—and it knocked on the door like some inconvenient relative arriving at the dinner party in muddy shoes and a knit hat. Fierce ideological battles are currently being waged among the people who own and shepherd the currency. Some shout, Ponzi scheme. Some shout, Gold dust. Bitcoin alone is worth billions of dollars, but the computational structure behind it—its blockchain and its sidechains—could become the absolute underpinning of the world's financial structure for decades to come.
What bitcoin has needed for years is a face to legitimize it, sanitize it, make it palpable to all the naysayers. But it has no Larry Ellison, no Elon Musk, no noticeable visionaries either with or without the truth. There's a lot of ideology at stake. A lot of principle and dogma and creed. And an awful lot of cash, too.
At 6:00 on a Wednesday winter morning, three months after launching Gemini, their bitcoin exchange, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss step out onto Broadway in New York, wearing the same make of sneakers, the same type of shorts, their baseball caps turned backward. They don't quite fall into the absolute caricature of twindom: They wear different-colored tops. Still, it's difficult to tell them apart, where Tyler ends and Cameron begins. Their faces are sculpted from another era, as if they had stepped from the ruin of one of Gatsby's parties. Their eyes are quick and seldom land on anything for long. Now thirty-four, there is something boyishly earnest about them as they jog down Prince Street, braiding in and out of each other, taking turns talking, as if they were working in shifts, drafting off each other.
Forget, for a moment, the four things the Winklevosses are most known for: suing Mark Zuckerberg, their portrayal in The Social Network, rowing in the Beijing Olympics, and their overwhelming public twinness. Because the Winklevoss brothers are betting just about everything—including their past—on a fifth thing: They want to shake the soul of money out.
At the deep end of their lives, they are athletes. Rowers. Full stop. And the thing about rowing—which might also be the thing about bitcoin—is that it's just about impossible to get your brain around its complexity. Everyone thinks you're going to a picnic. They have this notion you're out catching butterflies. They might ask you if you've got your little boater's hat ready. But it's not like that at all. You're fifteen years old. You rise in the dark. You drag your carcass along the railroad tracks before dawn. The boathouse keys are cold to the touch. You undo the ropes. You carry a shell down to the river. The carbon fiber rips at your hands. You place the boat in the water. You slip the oars in the locks. You wait for your coach. Nothing more than a thumb of light in the sky. It's still cold and the river stinks. That heron hasn't moved since yesterday. You hear Coach's voice before you see him. On you go, lads. You start at a dead sprint. The left rib's a little sore, but you don't say a thing. You are all power and no weight. The first push-to-pull in the water is a ripping surprise. From the legs first. Through the whole body. The arc. Atomic balance. A calm waiting for the burst. Your chest burns, your thighs scald, your brain blanks. It feels as if your rib cage might shatter. You are stillness exploding. You catch the water almost without breaking the surface. Coach says something about the pole vault. You like him. You really do. That brogue of his. Lads this, lads that. Fire. Stamina. Pain. After two dozen strokes, it already feels like you're hitting the wall. All that glycogen gone. Nobody knows. Nobody. They can't even pronounce it. Rowing. Ro-wing. Roh-ing. You push again, then pull. You feel as if you are breaking branch after branch off the bottom of your feet. You don't rock. You don't jolt. Keep it steady. Left, right, left, right. The heron stays still. This river. You see it every day. Nothing behind you. Everything in front. You cross the line. You know the exact tree. Your chest explodes. Your knees are trembling. This is the way the world will end, not with a whimper but a bang. You lean over the side of the boat. Up it comes, the breakfast you almost didn't have. A sign of respect to the river. You lay back. Ah, blue sky. Some cloud. Some gray. Do it again, lads. Yes, sir. You row so hard you puke it up once more. And here comes the heron, it's moving now, over the water, here it comes, look at that thing glide.
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The Winklevoss twins in the men's pair final during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. GETTY There's plenty of gin and beer and whiskey in the Harrison Room in downtown Manhattan, but the Winklevoss brothers sip Coca-Cola. The room, one of many in the newly renovated Pier A restaurant, is all mahogany and lamplight. It is, in essence, a floating bar, jutting four hundred feet out into the Hudson River. From the window you can see the Statue of Liberty. It feels entirely like their sort of room, a Jazz Age expectation hovering around their initial appearance—tall, imposing, the hair mannered, the collars of their shirts slightly tilted—but then they just slide into their seats, tentative, polite, even introverted.
They came here by subway early on a Friday evening, and they lean back in their seats, a little wary, their eyes busy—as if they want to look beyond the rehearsal of their words.
They had the curse of privilege, but, as they're keen to note, a curse that was earned. Their father worked to pay his way at a tiny college in backwoods Pennsylvania coal country. He escaped the small mining town and made it all the way to a professorship at Wharton. He founded his own company and eventually created the comfortable upper-middle-class family that came with it. They were raised in Greenwich, Connecticut, the most housebroken town on the planet. They might have looked like the others in their ZIP code, and dressed like them, spoke like them, but they didn't quite feel like them. Some nagging feeling—close to anger, close to fear—lodged itself beneath their shoulders, not quite a chip but an ache. They wanted Harvard but weren't quite sure what could get them there. "You have to be basically the best in the world at something if you're coming from Greenwich," says Tyler. "Otherwise it's like, great, you have a 1600 SAT, you and ten thousand others, so what?"
The rowing was a means to an end, but there was also something about the boat that they felt allowed another balance between them. They pulled their way through high school, Cameron on the port-side oar, Tyler on the starboard. They got to Harvard. The Square was theirs. They rowed their way to the national championships—twice. They went to Oxford. They competed in the Beijing Olympics. They sucked up the smog. They came in sixth place. The cameras loved them. Girls, too. They were so American, sandy-haired, blue-eyed, they could have been cast in a John Cougar Mellencamp song.
It might all have been so clean-cut and whitebread except for the fact that—at one of the turns in the river—they got involved in the most public brawl in the whole of the Internet's nascent history.
They don't talk about it much anymore, but they know that it still defines them, not so much in their own minds but in the minds of others. The story seems simple on one level, but nothing is ever simple, not even simplification. Theirs was the original idea for the first social network, Harvard Connection. They hired Mark Zuckerberg to build it. Instead he went off and created Facebook. They sued him. They settled for $65 million. It was a world of public spats and private anguish. Rumors and recriminations. A few years later, dusty old pre-Facebook text messages were leaked online by Silicon Alley Insider: "Yeah, I'm going to fuck them," wrote Zuckerberg to a friend. "Probably in the ear." The twins got their money, but then they believed they were duped again by an unfairly low evaluation of their stock. They began a second round of lawsuits for $180 million. There was even talk about the Supreme Court. It reeked of opportunism. But they wouldn't let it go. In interviews, they came across as insolent and splenetic, tossing their rattles out of the pram. It wasn't about the money, they said at the time, it was about fairness, reality, justice. Most people thought it was about some further agile fuckery, this time in Zuckerberg's ear.
There are many ways to tell the story, but perhaps the most penetrating version is that they weren't screwed so much by Zuckerberg as they were by their eventual portrayal in the film version of their lives. They appeared querulous and sulky, exactly the type of characters that America, peeling off the third-degree burns of the great recession, needed to hate. While the rest of the country worried about mounting debt and vanishing jobs, they were out there drinking champagne from, at the very least, Manolo stilettos. The truth would never get in the way of a good story. In Aaron Sorkin's world, and on just about every Web site, the blueblood trust-fund boys got what was coming to them. And the best thing now was for them to take their Facebook money and turn the corner, quickly, away, down toward whatever river would whisk them away.
Armie Hammer brilliantly portrayed them as the bluest of bloods in The Social Network. When the twins are questioned about those times now, they lean back a little in their seats, as if they've just lost a long race, a little perplexed that they came off as the victims of Hollywood's ability to throw an image, while the whole rip-roaring regatta still goes on behind them. "They put us in a box," says Cameron, "caricatured to a point where we didn't really exist." He glances around the bar, drums his finger against the glass. "That's fair enough. I understand that impulse." They smart a little when they hear Zuckerberg's name. "I don't think Mark liked being called an asshole," says Tyler, with a flick of bluster in his eyes, but then he catches himself. "You know, maybe Mark doesn't care. He's a bit of a statesman now, out there connecting the world. I have nothing against him. He's a smart guy."
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. But underneath the calm—just like underneath the boat—one can sense the churn.
They say the word—ath-letes—as if it were a country where pain is the passport. One of the things the brothers mention over and over again is that you can spontaneously crack a rib while rowing, just from the sheer exertion of the muscles hauling on the rib cage.
Along came bitcoin.
At its most elemental, bitcoin is a virtual currency. It's the sort of thing a five-year-old can understand—It's just e-cash, Mom—until he reaches eighteen and he begins to question the deep future of what money really means. It is a currency without government. It doesn't need a banker. It doesn't need a bank. It doesn't even need a brick to be built upon. Its supporters say that it bypasses the Man. It is less than a decade old and it has already come through its own Wild West, a story rooted in uncharted digital territory, up from the dust, an evening redness in the arithmetical West.
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. Bitcoin appeared in 2008—westward ho!—a little dot on the horizon of the Internet. It was the brainchild of a computer scientist named Satoshi Nakamoto. The first sting in the tale is that—to this very day—nobody knows who Nakamoto is, where he lives, or how much of his own invention he actually owns. He could be Californian, he could be Australian, he could even be a European conglomerate, but it doesn't really matter, since what he created was a cryptographic system that is borderless and supposedly unbreakable.
In the beginning the currency was ridiculed and scorned. It was money created from ones and zeros. You either bought it or you had to "mine" for it. If you were mining, your computer was your shovel. Any nerd could do it. You keyed your way in. By using your computer to help check and confirm the bitcoin transactions of others, you made coin. Everyone in this together. The computer heated up and mined, down down down, into the mathematical ground, lifting up numbers, making and breaking camp every hour or so until you had your saddlebags full of virtual coin. It all seemed a bit of a lark at first. No sheriff, no deputy, no central bank. The only saloon was a geeky chat room where a few dozen bitcoiners gathered to chew data.
Lest we forget, money was filthy in 2008.
The collapse was coming. The banks were shorting out. The real estate market was a confederacy of dunces. Bernie Madoff's shadow loomed. Occupy was on the horizon. And all those Wall Street yahoos were beginning to squirm.
Along came bitcoin like some Jesse James of the financial imagination. It was the biggest disruption of money since coins. Here was an idea that could revolutionize the financial world. A communal articulation of a new era. Fuck American Express. Fuck Western Union. Fuck Visa. Fuck the Fed. Fuck the Treasury. Fuck the deregulated thievery of the twenty-first century.
To the earliest settlers, bitcoin suggested a moral way out. It was a money created from the ground up, a currency of the people, by the people, for the people, with all government control extinguished. It was built on a solid base of blockchain technology where everyone participated in the protection of the code. It attracted anarchists, libertarians, whistle-blowers, cypherpunks, economists, extropians, geeks, upstairs, downstairs, left-wing, right-wing. Sure, it could be used by businesses and corporations, but it could also be used by poor people and immigrants to send money home, instantly, honestly, anonymously, without charge, with a click of the keyboard. Everyone in the world had access to your transaction, but nobody had to know your name. It bypassed the suits. All you needed to move money was a phone or a computer. It was freedom of economic action, a sort of anarchy at its democratic best, no rulers, just rules.
Bitcoin, to the original explorers, was a safe pass through the government-occupied valleys: Those assholes were up there in the hills, but they didn't have any scopes on their rifles, and besides, bitcoin went through in communal wagons at night.
Ordinary punters took a shot. Businesses, too. You could buy silk ties in Paris without any extra bank charges. You could protect your money in Buenos Aires without fear of a government grab.
The Winklevoss twins leave the U.S. Court of Appeals in 2011, after appearing in court to ask that the previous settlement case against Facebook be voided. GETTY But freedom can corrupt as surely as power. It was soon the currency that paid for everything illegal under the sun, the go-to money of the darknet. The westward ho! became the outlaw territory of Silk Road and beyond. Heroin through the mail. Cocaine at your doorstep. Child porn at a click. What better way for terrorists to ship money across the world than through a network of anonymous computers? Hezbollah, the Taliban, the Mexican cartels. In Central America, kidnappers began demanding ransom in bitcoin—there was no need for the cash to be stashed under a park bench anymore. Now everything could travel down the wire. Grab, gag, and collect. Uranium could be paid for in bitcoin. People, too. The sex trade was turned on: It was a perfect currency for Madame X. For the online gambling sites, bitcoin was pure jackpot.
For a while, things got very shady indeed. Over a couple years, the rate pinballed between $10 and $1,200 per bitcoin, causing massive waves and troughs of online panic and greed. (In recent times, it has begun to stabilize between $350 and $450.) In 2014, it was revealed that hackers had gotten into the hot wallet of Mt. Gox, a bitcoin exchange based in Tokyo. A total of 850,000 coins were "lost," at an estimated value of almost half a billion dollars. The founder of Silk Road, Ross William Ulbricht (known as "Dread Pirate Roberts"), got himself a four-by-six room in a federal penitentiary for life, not to mention pending charges for murder-for-hire in Maryland.
Everyone thought that bitcoin was the problem. The fact of the matter was, as it so often is, human nature was the problem. Money means desire. Desire means temptation. Temptation means that people get hurt.
During the first Gold Rush in the late 1840s, the belief was that all you needed was a pan and a decent pair of boots and a good dose of nerve and you could go out and make yourself a riverbed millionaire. Even Jack London later fell for the lure of it alongside thousands of others: the western test of manhood and the promise of wealth. What they soon found out was that a single egg could cost twenty-five of today's dollars, a pound of coffee went for a hundred, and a night in a whorehouse could set you back $6,000.
A few miners hit pay dirt, but what most ended up with for their troubles was a busted body and a nasty dose of syphilis.
The gold was discovered on the property of John Sutter in Sacramento, but the one who made the real cash was a neighboring merchant, Samuel Brannan. When Brannan heard the news of the gold nuggets, he bought up all the pickaxes and shovels he could find, filled a quinine bottle with gold dust, and went to San Francisco. Word went around like a prayer in a flash flood: gold gold gold. Brannan didn't wildcat for gold himself, but at the peak of the rush he was flogging $5,000 worth of shovels a day—that's $155,000 today—and went on to become the wealthiest man in California, alongside the Wells Fargo crew, Levi Strauss, and the Studebaker family, who sold wheelbarrows.
If you comb back through the Winklevoss family, you will find a great-grandfather and a great-great-grandfather who knew a thing or two about digging: They worked side by side in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. They didn't go west and they didn't get rich, but maybe the lesson became part of their DNA: Sometimes it's the man who sells the shovels who ends up hitting gold.
Like it or not—and many people don't like it—the Winklevoss brothers are shaping up to be the Samuel Brannans of the bitcoin world.
Nine months after being portrayed in The Social Network, the Winklevoss twins were back out on the water at the World Rowing Cup. CHRISTOPHER LEE/GETTY They heard about it first poolside in Ibiza, Spain. Later it would play into the idea of ease and privilege: umbrella drinks and girls in bikinis. But if the creation myth was going to be flippant, the talk was serious. "I'd say we were cautious, but we were definitely intrigued," says Cameron. They went back home to New York and began to read. There was something about it that got under their skin. "We knew that money had been so broken and inefficient for years," says Tyler, "so bitcoin appealed to us right away."
They speak in braided sentences, catching each other, reassuring themselves, tightening each other's ideas. They don't quite want to say that bitcoin looked like something that might be redemptive—after all, they, like everyone else, were looking to make money, lots of it, Olympic-sized amounts—but they say that it did strike an idealistic chord inside them. They certainly wouldn't be cozying up to the anarchists anytime soon, but this was a global currency that, despite its uncertainties, seemed to present a solution to some of the world's more pressing problems. "It was borderless, instantaneous, irreversible, decentralized, with virtually no transaction costs," says Tyler. It could possibly cut the banks out, and it might even take the knees out from under the credit-card companies. Not only that, but the price, at just under ten dollars per coin, was in their estimation low, very low. They began to snap it up.
They were aware, even at the beginning, that they might, once again, be called Johnny-come-latelys, just hopping blithely on the bandwagon—it was 2012, already four years into the birth of the currency—but they went ahead anyway, power ten. Within a short time they'd spent $11 million buying up a whopping 1 percent of the world's bitcoin, a position they kept up as more bitcoins were mined, making their 1 percent holding today worth about $66 million.
But bitcoin was flammable. The brothers felt the burn quickly. Their next significant investment came later that year, when they gave $1.5 million in venture funding to a nascent exchange called BitInstant. Within a year the CEO was arrested for laundering drug money through the exchange.
So what were a pair of smart, clean-cut Olympic rowers doing hanging around the edges of something so apparently shady, and what, if anything, were they going to do about it?
They mightn't have thought of it this way, but there was something of the sheriff striding into town, the one with the swagger and the scar, glancing up at the balconies as he comes down Main Street, all tumbleweeds and broken pianos. This place was a dump in most people's eyes, but the sheriff glimpsed his last best shot at finally getting the respect he thinks he deserves.
The money shot: A good stroke will catch the water almost without breaking its seal. You stir without rippling. Your silence is sinewy. There's muscle in that calm. The violence catches underneath, thrusts the boat along. Stroke after stroke. Just keep going. Today's truth dies tomorrow. What you have to do is elemental enough. You row without looking behind you. You keep the others in front of you. As long as you can see what they're doing, it's all in your hands. You are there to out-pain them. Doesn't matter who they are, where they come from, how they got here. Know your enemy through yourself. Push through toward pull. Find the still point of this pain. Cut a melody in the disk of your flesh. The only terror comes when they pass you—if they ever pass you.
There are no suits or ties, but there is a white hum in the offices of Gemini in the Flatiron District. The air feels as if it has been brushed clean. There is something so everywhereabout the place. Ergonomic chairs. iPhone portals. Rows of flickering computers. Not so much a hush around the room as a quiet expectation. Eight, nine people. Programmers, analysts, assistants. Other employees—teammates, they call them—dialing in from Portland, Oregon, and beyond.
The brothers fire up the room when they walk inside. A fist-pump here, a shoulder touch there. At the same time, there is something almost shy about them. Apart, they seem like casual visitors to the space they inhabit. It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long.
The Winklevoss twins speak onstage at Bitcoin! Let's Cut Through the Noise Already at SXSW in 2016. GETTY They move from desk to desk. The price goes up, the price goes down. The phones ring. The e-mails beep. Customer-service calls. Questions about fees. Inquiries about tax structures.
Gemini was started in late 2015 as a next-generation bitcoin exchange. It is not the first such exchange in the world by any means, but it is one of the most watched. The company is designed with ordinary investors in mind, maybe a hedge fund, maybe a bank: all those people who used to be confused or even terrified by the word bitcoin. It is insured. It is clean. What's so fascinating about this venture is that the brothers are risking themselves by trying to eliminate risk: keeping the boat steady and exploding through it at the same time.
It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long. For the past couple years, the Winklevosses have worked closely with just about every compliance agency imaginable. They ticked off all the regulatory boxes. Essentially they wanted to ease all the Debting Thomases. They put regulatory frameworks in place. Security and bankability and insurance were their highest objectives. Nobody was going to be able to blow open the safe. They wanted to soothe all the appetites for risk. They told Bitcoin Magazine they were asking for "permission, not forgiveness."
This is where bitcoin can become normal—that is, if you want bitcoin to be normal.
Just a mile or two down the road, in Soho, a half dozen bitcoiners gather at a meetup. The room is scruffy, small, boxy. A half mannequin is propped on a table, a scarf draped around it. It's the sort of place that twenty years ago would have been full of cigarette smoke. There's a bit of Allen Ginsberg here, a touch of Emma Goldman, a lot of Zuccotti Park. The wine is free and the talk is loose. These are the true believers. They see bitcoin in its clearest possible philosophical terms—the frictionless currency of the people, changing the way people move money around the world, bypassing the banks, disrupting the status quo.
A comedy show is being run out in the backyard. A scruffy young man wanders in and out, announcing over and over again that he is half-baked. A well-dressed Asian girl sidles up to the bar. She looks like she's just stepped out of an NYU business class. She's interested in discovering what bitcoin is. She is regaled by a series of convivial answers. The bartender tells her that bitcoin is a remaking of the prevailing power structures. The girl asks for another glass of wine. The bartender adds that bitcoin is democracy, pure and straight. She nods and tells him that the wine tastes like cooking oil. He laughs and says it wasn't bought with bitcoin. "I don't get it," she says. And so the evening goes, presided over by Margaux Avedisian, who describes herself as the queen of bitcoin. Avedisian, a digital-currency consultant of Armenian descent, is involved in several high-level bitcoin projects. She has appeared in documentaries and on numerous panels. She is smart, sassy, articulate.
When the talk turns to the Winklevoss brothers, the bar turns dark. Someone, somewhere, reaches up to take all the oxygen out of the air. Avedisian leans forward on the counter, her eyes shining, delightful, raged.
"The Winklevii are not the face of bitcoin," she says. "They're jokes. They don't know what they're saying. Nobody in our community respects them. They're so one-note. If you look at their exchange, they have no real volume, they never will. They keep throwing money at different things. Nobody cares. They're not part of us. They're just hangers-on."
"Ah, they're just assholes," the bartender chimes in.
"What they want to do," says Avedisian, "is lobotomize bitcoin, make it into something entirely vapid. They have no clue."
The Asian girl leaves without drinking her third glass of free wine. She's got a totter in her step. She doesn't quite get the future of money, but then again maybe very few in the world do.
Giving testimony on bitcoin licensing before the New York State Department of Financial Services in 2014. LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS The future of money might look like this: You're standing on Oxford Street in London in winter. You think about how you want to get to Charing Cross Road. The thought triggers itself through electrical signals into the chip embedded in your wrist. Within a moment, a driverless car pulls up on the sensor-equipped road. The door opens. You hop in. The car says hello. You tell it to shut up. It does. It already knows where you want to go. It turns onto Regent Street. You think,A little more air-conditioning, please. The vents blow. You think, Go a little faster, please. The pace picks up. You think, This traffic is too heavy, use Quick(TM). The car swings down Glasshouse Street. You think, Pay the car in front to get out of my way. It does. You think, Unlock access to a shortcut. The car turns down Sherwood Street to Shaftsbury Avenue. You pull in to Charing Cross. You hop out. The car says goodbye. You tell it to shut up again. You run for the train and the computer chip in your wrist pays for the quiet-car ticket for the way home.
All of these transactions—the air-conditioning, the pace, the shortcut, the bribe to get out of the way, the quick lanes, the ride itself, the train, maybe even the "shut up"—will cost money. As far as crypto-currency enthusiasts think, it will be paid for without coins, without phones, without glass screens, just the money coming in and going out of your preprogrammed wallet embedded beneath your skin.
The Winklevosses are betting that the money will be bitcoin. And that those coins will flow through high-end, corporate-run exchanges like Gemini rather than smoky SoHo dives.
Cameron leans across a table in a New York diner, the sort of place where you might want to polish your fork just in case, and says: "The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed yet." He can't remember whom the quote belongs to, but he freely acknowledges that it's not his own. Theirs is a truculent but generous intelligence, capable of surprise and turn at the oddest of moments. They talk meditation, they talk economics, they talk Van Halen, they talk, yes, William Gibson, but everything comes around again to bitcoin.
"The key to all this is that people aren't even going to know that they're using bitcoin," says Tyler. "It's going to be there, but it's not going to be exposed to the end user. Bitcoin is going to be the rails that underpin our payment systems. It's just like an IP address. We don't log on to a series of numbers, 115.425.5 or whatever. No, we log on to Google.com. In the same way, bitcoin is going to be disguised. There will be a body kit that makes it user-friendly. That's what makes bitcoin a kick-ass currency."
Any fool can send a billion dollars across the world—as long as they have it, of course—but it's virtually impossible to send a quarter unless you stick it in an envelope and pay forty-nine cents for a stamp. It's one of the great ironies of our antiquated money system. And yet the quark of the financial world is essentially the small denomination. What bitcoin promises is that it will enable people and businesses to send money in just about any denomination to one another, anywhere in the world, for next to nothing. A public address, a private key, a click of the mouse, and the money is gone.
A Bitcoin conference in New York City in 2014. GETTY This matters. This matters a lot. Credit-card companies can't do this. Neither can the big banks under their current systems. But Marie-Louise on the corner of Libertador Avenue can. And so can Pat Murphy in his Limerick housing estate. So can Mark Andreessen and Bill Gates and Laurene Powell Jobs. Anyone can do it, anywhere in the world, at virtually no charge.
You can do it, in fact, from your phone in a diner in New York. But the whole time they are there—over identical California omelettes that they order with an ironic shrug—they never once open their phones. They come across more like the talkative guys who might buy you a drink at the sports bar than the petulants ordering bottle service in the VIP corner. The older they get, the more comfortable they seem in their contradictions: the competition, the ease; the fame, the quiet; the gamble, the sure thing.
Bitcoin is what might eventually make them among the richest men in America. And yet. There is always a yet. What seems indisputable about the future of money, to the Winklevosses and other bitcoin adherents, is that the technology that underpins bitcoin—the blockchain—will become one of the fundamental tenets of how we deal with the world of finance. Blockchain is the core computer code. It's open source and peer to peer—in other words, it's free and open to you and me. Every single bitcoin transaction ever made goes to an open public ledger. It would take an unprecedented 51 percent attack—where one entity would come to control more than half of the computing power used to mine bitcoin—for hackers to undo it. The blockchain is maintained by computers all around the world, and its future sidechains will create systems that deal with contracts and stock and other payments. These sidechains could very well be the foundation of the new global economy for the big banks, the credit-card companies, and even government itself.
"It's boundless," says Cameron.
This is what the brothers are counting on—and what might eventually make them among the richest men in America.
And yet. There is always a yet.
When you delve into the world of bitcoin, it gets deeper, darker, more mysterious all the time. Why has its creator remained anonymous? Why did he drop off the face of the earth? How much of it does he own himself? Will banks and corporations try to bring the currency down? Why are there really only five developers with full "commit access" to the code (not the Winklevosses, by the way)? Who is really in charge of the currency's governance?
Perhaps the most pressing issue at hand is that of scaling, which has caused what amounts to a civil war among followers. A maximum block size of one megabyte has been imposed on the chain, sort of like a built-in artificial dampener to keep bitcoin punk rock. That's not nearly enough capacity for the number of transactions that would take place in future visions. In years to come, there could be massive backlogs and outages that could create instant financial panic. Bitcoin's most influential leaders are haggling over what will happen. Will bitcoin maintain its decentralized status, or will it go legit and open up to infinite transactions? And if it goes legit, where's the punk?
The issues are ongoing—and they might very well take bitcoin down, but the Winklevosses don't think so. They have seen internal disputes before. They've refrained from taking a public stance mostly because they know that there are a lot of other very smart people in bitcoin who are aware that crisis often builds consensus. "We're in this for the long haul," says Tyler. "We're the first batter in the first inning."
GILLIAN LAUB The waiter comes across and asks them, bizarrely, if they're twins. They nod politely. Who was born first? They've heard it a million times and their answer is always the same: Neither of them—they were born cesarean. Cameron looks older, says the waiter. Tyler grins. Normally it's the other way around, says Cameron, grinning back. Do you ever fight? asks the waiter. Every now and then, they say. But not over this, not over the future.
Heraclitus was wrong. You can, in fact, step in the same river twice. In the beginning you went to the shed. No electricity there, no heat, just a giant tub where you simulated the river. You could only do eleven strokes. But there was something about the repetition, the difference, even the monotony, that hooked you. After a while it wasn't an abandoned shed anymore. College gyms, national training centers. Bigger buildings. High ceilings. AC. Doctors and trainers. Monitors hooked up to your heart, your head, your blood. Six foot five, but even then you were not as tall as the other guys. You liked the notion of underdog. Everyone called you the opposite. The rich kids. The privileged ones. To hell with that. They don't know us, who we are, where we came from. Some of the biggest chips rest on the shoulders of those with the least to lose. Six foot five times two makes just about thirteen feet. You sit in the erg and you stare ahead. Day in, day out. One thousand strokes, two thousand. You work with the very best. You even train with the Navy SEALs. It touches that American part of you. The sentiment, the false optimism. When the oil fields are burning, you even think, I'll go there with them. But you stay in the boat. You want that other flag rising. That's what you aim for. You don't win but you get close. Afterward there are planes, galas, regattas, magazine spreads, but you always come back to that early river. The cold. The fierceness. The heron. Like it or not, you're never going to get off the water—that's just the fact of the matter, it's always going to be there. Hard to admit it, but once you were wrong. You got out of the boat and you haggled over who made it. You lost that one, hard. You might lose this one, too, but then again it just might be the original arc that you're stepping toward. So you return, then. You rise before dark. You drag your carcass along Broadway before dawn.
All the rich men in the world want to get shot into outer space. Richard Branson. Jeff Bezos. Elon Musk. The new explorers. To get the hell out of here and see if they—and maybe we—can exist somewhere else for a while. It's the story of the century. We want to know if the pocket of the universe can be turned inside out. We're either going to bring all the detritus of the world upward with us or we're going to find a brand-new way to exist. The cynical say that it's just another form of colonization—they're probably right, but then again maybe it's our only way out.
The Winklevosses have booked their tickets—numbers 700 and 701—on Branson's Virgin Galactic. Although they go virtually everywhere together, the twins want to go on different flights because of the risk involved: Now that they're in their mid-thirties, they can finally see death, or at least its rumor. It's a boy's adventure, but it's also the outer edge of possibility. It cost a quarter of a million dollars per seat, and they paid for it, yes, in bitcoin.
Of course, up until recently, the original space flights all splashed down into the sea. One of the ships that hauled the Gemini space capsule out of the water in 1965 was the Intrepid aircraft carrier.
The Winklevosses no longer pull their boat up the river. Instead they often run five miles along the Hudson to the Intrepid and back. The destroyer has been parked along Manhattan's West Side for almost as long as they have been alive. It's now a museum. The brothers like the boat, its presence, its symbolism: Intrepid, Gemini, the space shot.
They ease into the run.
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Facebook is banning all ads promoting cryptocurrencies — including bitcoin and ICOs

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 35%. (I'm a bot)
Facebook is banning all ads that promote cryptocurrencies, including bitcoin, in an effort to prevent people from advertising what the company is calling "Financial products and services frequently associated with misleading or deceptive promotional practices."
That means no advertiser - even those that operate legal, legitimate businesses - will be able to promote things like bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, initial coin offerings - ICOs for short - or binary options, according to a Facebook blog post.
That also means that "Crypto-genius" James Altucher, whose ads have appeared all over the internet and have become a meme of sorts for the entire crypto industry, won't be able to advertise on Facebook.
Ads that violate the company's new policy will be banned on Facebook's core app, but also in other places where Facebook sells ads, including Instagram and its ad network, Audience Network, which places ads on third-party apps.
Facebook's board of directors includes two investors - Marc Andreessen and Peter Thiel - whose firms have been prominent crypto backers.
Facebook Messenger boss, David Marcus, is also on the board at the popular crypto exchange Coinbase.
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: Facebook#1 ad#2 crypto#3 advertise#4 includes#5
Post found in /Bitcoin, /Buttcoin, /news, /CryptoCurrency, /BitcoinAll, /hackernews, /cryptonewswire, /techinvestor, /bprogramming and /NewsWhatever.
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What’s On Crypto – News Week In Review | April 8th to 16th

32,000 Indians signed a petition against the ban on cryptocurrency. On Thursday, April 5, the central bank of India decided to ban transactions with crypto-currencies: financial institutions are obliged to stop the activity related to crypto-currencies for three months. On the same day, India’s crypto community compiled a petition addressing its central bank and prime minister, calling not to stifle the developing technology, but to create a legislative framework that would allow it to develop and exert a beneficial influence on the country’s economy. To date, more than 32,000 Indians signed a petition on change.org. Authors of the document draw attention to the fact that local crypto-exchange exchanges try to strictly adhere to established norms and many are already strengthening the standards of KYC. Also, the petition mentions the Central Bank’s plan to issue its own cryptocurrency. The protesters noted that the current CEO of Microsoft and Google are of Indian origin and, under a favourable environment, could create local Internet companies, hinting that the next generation of “technical geniuses” could go their way. Similar risks were also appealed to by Chinese crypto-entrepreneur, criticizing the prohibitive policies of his country and saying that China might miss the “new Amazon”.
Earlier, in December, a petition to protest the announced restrictions amounted to the citizens of South Korea, and recently it became known that the Tax Administration, Ministry of Justice and the country’s financial regulators are discussing the possibility to lift the ban on the holding of the ICO. The mayor of Seoul noted, that after “terrible resistance” from the side of society, the government “seriously thought about” possible loosening.
The Shanghai police interrupted the blocking conference. On Thursday, April 12, China had to host the Global Fintech & Blockchain China Summit 2018. However, around noon local time, the police interrupted morning session, ordering all participants and organizers to leave the event. The official reasons for the intervention are currently being specified, but according to the assumptions that appeared in the media and the Chinese social network Weibo, an ICO project was announced in the conference program, the investors of which lost a lot of money. They filed a complaint with the police. The organizing company, PTP International, denied these rumors, saying that the event was in full compliance with Chinese laws: “We are still investigating the reasons for the suspension, and at the moment the police refers to the security threat. We are thinking about possible compensation for the participants in the meeting. The conference was held in accordance with the Chinese regulations and did not include any ICO presentations, “PTP International said.
The Golem computing platform has launched the core network. Golem, who collected 820,000 airs during the ICO in 2016 ($ 8.2 million at that time and about $ 340 million today), two years later presented a beta version of the main network, which in white paper isdescribed as “Copper Golem” – the first phase of the project. In the current format, a service based on the Ethereum block system allows computers to “rent” the unused energy of the CPU and create computer-generated images (CGIs) using the Blender software (including animation, visual effects, interactive 3D applications and video games). The interface directly associated with Blender allows you to purchase processing power for the Golem-GNT token.
This release of the “Copper Golem” is designed to test the work of technology in real market conditions for real money. Golem software connects the providers of computing power with “customers” and sends small tasks to the provider, which will later be merged into P2P networks and presented as a single image, explains Golem CEO Julian Zavistovsky. In 2016 Golem represented one of the first generations of Ethereum-applications: “To underestimate the complexity of what we want to create is typical for software development in general, and especially for the blockbuster,” Zavistovsky says, explaining the protracted work on the project. According to white paper, the following, more progressive versions should be “Clay Golem”, “Stone Golem” and “Iron Golem”. Simultaneously with the release of the main network, the team announced the launch of a bounty program that will encourage developers to report on detected bugs.
Gemini launches trading blocks for bitcoin and ether and can introduce a patented system that increases the security of transactions. On Thursday, at 9:30 am North American Eastern Time, the currency exchange, owned by the bitcoin-billionaires of the Winklevoss brothers, launched trading in blocks for the two leading crypto-currencies. The new option is designed primarily for institutional investors: the minimum threshold is 10 bitcoins and 100 airs. Bidding blocks are designed to provide an “additional source of liquidity”, allowing for large transactions outside the main book of orders. Also, due to the new function, buying or selling a large amount of cryptocurrency will not have a significant impact on its rate. As explained in exchange, “any user can place an order, indicating the type of transaction (purchase or sale), the amount, the minimum amount of filling and price limits.” Marketmakers will receive only information about the amount of the transaction, the minimum volume and the upper limit: if they decide to execute the transaction, the block will be filled.
“In accordance with our obligations to maintain fair, transparent and regulated trading, block orders in electronic form will be instantly transferred to participating market makers, which will ensure the best execution of the transaction and setting prices for the participants of the program,” reads the website of the exchange. Also this week, Winklevoss IP, LLC received a patent to create a system that increases the security of transactions. Authors Andrew Laucius, Cem Paya and Eric Wiener describe “software for secure transaction processing in the cloud computing system”. The new development uses a combination of standard cryptographic techniques, including hash functions and digital signatures, and presumably can be applied on the Gemini exchange.
The stakes of Basecoin and Carbon have successfully completed investment rounds. Intangible Labs, the creators of the “steel coin with the algorithmic central bank” Basecoin, collected $ 125 million during the tokenail on the SAFT system from March 22 to April 3 (according to the experts’ assumptions, this particular ICO format recently attracted the SEC’s attention).
The organizers reported to the SEC on attracting this amount from 225 investors. Basecoin intends to avoid the inherent volatility of the crypto currency due to its provision with other digital assets: the oracles will monitor the prices of these assets, and the protocol should regulate the number of tokens so that the price of Basecoin remains stable. In addition to the “basecoins”, the startup is developing “basic bonds” and “basic shares” – crypto-currencies, which will support Basecoin, helping the protocol to manage the “money supply”.
The project is supported by many large funds, including Andreessen Horowitz, Pantera Capital, PolyChain Capital and Digital Currency Group. Coinbase co-founder Fred Ehrsam took Basecoin to significant projects for the ecosystem: “It is obvious to me that the developers of the crypto-industry are interested in … a stable coin, ” Ehrsam said during the Token Summit II in San Francisco. On Thursday the completion of the seed round of funding announced another project of stablcoin is Carbon, which raised $ 2 million from such funds as General Catalyst, Digital Currency Group, FirstMark Capital, Plug and Play Ventures and The Fund. Like Basecoin, Carbon rejects the Tether reinforcement model for Fiat, replacing it with algorithmic monetary policy. “If we create a mechanism that is currently used by the Federal Reserve Bank, but we will make it decentralized, we will not need to trust the central government. We can just trust the code, “explained Carbon co-founder Connor Lin. The Carbon system includes two tokens: the stebblecoin itself, whose price should be $ 1, and a “credit token” that fluctuates in value, offsetting changes in demand. When the price of stebblecoin falls, an auction is held, during which anyone can give his token, thereby reducing the money supply and raising the price, and get a “credit token” instead. Later, when the price rises above $ 1 and the offer increases, holders of “credit tokens” will receive new steebles and this entire process is fully implemented by the algorithm.
Start bitcoin cloud mining
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Bitcoin In Their Own Words: Marc Andreessen Marc Andreessen: Vision for Bitcoin Marc Andreessen's Bitcoin Tweetstorm (Jan 5th) Marc Andreesen Bitcoin OCM Summit Im Blick. 68: M. Andreessen Software-Revolution & Bitcoin + FSB Überwachungs-Rahmen für Kryptomarkt

Marc Andreessen, co-founder of venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, has praised the virtues of bitcoin, in an essay published by The New York Times.. In the piece, entitled “Why Bitcoin ... Marc Andreessen talks bitcoin, Apple Pay and the problems they face at the Dreamforce 2014 conference in San Francisco. Marc Andreessen wurde am 9. Juli 1971 in Cedar Falls, Iowa geboren und in Neues Lissabon, Wisconsin angehoben. In 1993, erhielt er einen Bachelor-Abschluss in Informatik von der University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. Er internierte bei IBM in Austin, Texas. Nach seinem Abschluss an der UIUC im Jahr 1993 zog er nach Kalifornien, weil ihn Enterprise Integration Technologies anstellte. Bitcoin believer Marc Andreessen said that his bet on the cryptocurrency is for the long term. "I compare it to the Internet," he said on CNBC. "The Internet was a new way to transmit data ... The investor and Web browser pioneer Marc Andreessen thinks we'll all look back in 20 years and conclude that Bitcoin was as influential a platform for innovation as the Internet itself was.

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Bitcoin In Their Own Words: Marc Andreessen

Sheryl Sandberg and Marc Andreessen on the Future of Mobile, Income Inequality, and Tech Trends - Duration: 41:36. Fortune Magazine 19,584 views Learn more at www.coinsumm.it Fireside chat with Marc Andreessen and Balaji Srinivasan, Andreessen Horowitz Moderated by Kashmir Hill, Forbes I like Bitcoin and a16z so I put together all 25 of @pmarca's tweets from his BTC storm January 5th 2015. See more at http://steveiq.com/ Enjoy. Bitcoin In Their Own Words: Marc Andreessen Full Interview: Bitcoin Fireside Chat with Marc Andreessen and Balaji Srinivasan (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v... "Why Software is eating the world" ist ein interessanter Artikel des amerikanischen Investors Marc Andreessen vom 20. August 2011. Vieles darin ist immer noch aktuell. Im Video habe ich mir ein ...

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